[[http://www.sthelena.vic.edu.au/libraryonline/deadly%20unna.htm#DEADLY, UNNA]]

http://www.puffin.com.au/products/9780141300498/deadly-unna

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Outcome

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Content. Teaching/learning activities. Resources. Assessment ... Teacher p reparation: chalk or whiteboard: “What is Deadly Unna? really about? ...
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Ambarvale High School
Stage 5 Writing unit

Focus texts: Deadly Unna? by Phillip Gwynne and Australian Rules, directed by Paul Goldman, 2002.

Focus Stage 5 Outcomes
A student:
1
responds to and composes increasingly sophisticated and sustained texts for understanding, interpretation, critical analysis and pleasure
2
uses and critically assesses a range of processes for responding and composing
3
selects, uses, describes and explains how different technologies affect and shape meaning
4
selects and uses language forms and features, and structures of texts according to different purposes, audiences and contexts, and describes and explains their effects on meaning
5
transfers understanding of language concepts into new and different contexts
7
thinks critically and interpretively using information, ideas and increasingly complex arguments to respond to and compose texts in a range of contexts

Stage 5 Outcomes content
Students learn to:
Students learn about:
1.1
respond to and compose a range of imaginative, factual and critical texts which are increasingly demanding in terms of their linguistic, structural, cognitive, emotional and moral complexity.
1.7
the ideas, information, perspectives and ideologies presented in increasingly demanding imaginative, factual and critical texts and the ways they are presented.
1.3
analyse the effectiveness and impact of texts on responders in terms of ideas, perspective and originality.
1.9
the ways sustained texts use elements such as evidence, argument, narrative, dialogue and climax.
1.5
respond to texts from different reading positions as an aspect of their developing moral and ethical stances on issues.
1.10
the use of variations within conventions of particular genres, including forms of poetry, fiction and film and how these variations address the composer’s purpose.
1.6
respond to and compose texts that use inference and figurative language, such as symbolism and allusion, in complex and subtle ways.
1.11
their own emerging sense of style, personal preference and discernment in responding to and composing texts.


2.9
processes of representation including use of symbols, images, icons, stereotypes, connotations, inference, and particular visual and aural techniques including those of camera, design and sound, to create cohesive texts.


2.10
the ways composers, including authors and film-makers, use processes of representation in composing texts.
3.2
identify and critically evaluate the ways information, ideas and issues are shaped by and presented through technology.
3.6
the ways in which modern technologies of communication are used to inform, persuade and entertain.


3.7
the ways in which modern technologies of communication are used to shape, adapt and re-present past and present cultures, including popular culture and youth cultures, for particular audiences.
4.2
describe, explain and evaluate the composer’s choices of language forms and features and structures of texts in terms of purpose, audience and context.
4.9
appropriate language forms and features and structures of texts to use in an increasingly wide range of contexts
4.4
experiment with and explain altered perceptions of ideas and information that result from changes in language features and structures.
4.10
the metalanguage for describing, explaining and justifying the composer’s choices of language forms and features and structures of texts in terms of purpose, audience and context.
4.5
adapt and justify language use appropriate to spoken, written and visual texts.

4.11
the influence of purpose, audience and context on the use of particular language and features and structures of text


4.13
codes and conventions, including emotive, evocative and impersonal language and signs, used to signal tone, mood and atmosphere in spoken, written and visual texts.
5.1
apply knowledge of language forms and features and structures of texts to respond to, compose and adapt texts to suit new and unfamiliar contexts.

5.6
the ways in which existing skills, knowledge and understanding about language can be used to access and express information for new purposes, audiences and contexts.

7.2
trace ideas and images through extended texts.

7.9
the ways bias, stereotypes, perspectives and ideologies are constructed in texts, including the codes and phrasings that signal them.
7.3
infer from and interpret texts.

7.10
sequence and hierarchy of ideas.

7.8
demonstrate abstract principles through concrete examples.

7.12
the ways the language of argument and persuasion can be adapted for different contexts.




Teaching and learning program

Content
Teaching/learning activities
Resources
Assessment

Field building phase
1. Read text: Deadly Unna? This activity can be set for home or class reading depending on your students’ needs, however, we advocate the shared reading approach and estimates this prose fiction text will take approximately five hours of class time to read.

Gwynne, P. (1999). Deadly Unna?, Melbourne: Penguin
All students will be able to: participate in the lesson by reading out aloud at least once in the session.
4.2
4.11
2. Understanding how language works in Deadly Unna? Students will complete worksheets, which examine the selection of language and the effect it has on the responder. Students will also learn how Phillip Gwynne has used language for special effect, such as humour, slang and as cultural references. These language-based activities are designed to build the field of knowledge for students. Rather than assessing comprehension, which is a low level thinking skill, students will be asked to link specific language to cultural knowledge and ‘in jokes’ to access further meaning from the story.

Worksheet 1: Field building: “Language worksheets”
All students will demonstrate: active engagement with the activity, more than 80% completion of worksheet activities at a rate of 80% correct. Students should also be informally assessed via their contributions to class discussions and direct questioning.
1.1
1.3
3. Personal response: At the completion of reading the text, half an hour should be set aside for a sustained silent writing activity. This activity should be free of instruction of any kind, thus acting as a “before” snapshot of the student’s writing skills. In folders or exercise books students will write a personal response to the following question: “What do you think Deadly Unna? is really about? Students can e-submit their responses. Teachers should collect student responses and keep for later comparison.
Teacher preparation: chalk or whiteboard: “What is Deadly Unna? really about?” or use computer lab for this part of the lesson so that students can submit.
All students must demonstrate an understanding of the text by composing a personal response to the question. This piece of writing will be informally assessed by the teacher and mainly used as a diagnostic method of directing future instruction. At this point corrections need not be made.
1.5
1.7
4. Reading messages from the text: This activity is designed to lead students through a process of critical thinking about the construction of representations within the text, “Deadly Unna?” By firstly identifying messages within the text, an interpretation can be formed. An interpretation is a necessary element of academic writing and the basis of critical thought. Students will complete initial questions on Worksheet 2 about audience, purpose and context, which will focus on the motivation for Gwynne’s composition. This may assist students in understanding the messages embedded in the text. Secondly, students will identify messages and rank them in order of importance. Finally, students will then practice drafting ideas, taking special care with word selection and seek clarity in representing their ideas.

Worksheet 2: Field building: “Messages from the text”
All students will demonstrate proficiency in:
(a) answering the focus questions without error,
(b) correctly identifying four messages from the text,
(c) listing these in rank order
(d) drafting their ideas into a cohesive, concise and precise piece of writing.

Teachers will need to mark these individually and look for evidence of student editing.
5.1
5.6

5. Using model texts: Using the reviews on Worksheet 3, read all aloud to the class. Using an overhead transparency of the same, annotate the structural features, language and the grammatical conventions of each of the
1. personal response,
2. review
3. interpretation aspects contained in each.

Teacher will brainstorm about content for the review and list on the chalk/whiteboard vocabulary suitable for use in a formal piece of writing such as a review. Students will then write their own review of the prose fiction text, Deadly Unna?.

Worksheet 3a: Identifying aspects of texts

Worksheet 3b: ‘Reading’ texts
Students will: demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of the text and the typical structures and features of reviews by composing a review, which conforms to the codes and conventions and evaluates the text using formal language.

1.6
1.9
1.10
6. Cine-literacy: Show film version of this text, Australian Rules. Students will complete a cine literacy worksheet while viewing the film.
Australian Rules, dir by Paul Goldman, Palace Films, 2002.

Worksheet 4: “Cine-literacy: Australian Rules”.

Teacher sheet: suggested answers

All students will participate by watching the film and completing the worksheet with 100% accuracy.
3.2
3.6
3.7
7. ICT activity: Using the “Google” search engine on the internet type in “Australian Rules film” and click on Australian web pages only. This should result in film reviews from the major broadsheet newspapers and media agencies.

Students will survey the reviews and make relevant notes from these sources (esp. Murdoch.edu). Students will also evaluate the effectiveness of the websites in light of the audience, context and purpose criteria used in previous worksheets.

This activity will also be the focus of class discussion on the manner in which the film and website shape responder perceptions and identify how this is achieved from on screen examples from this search and the film.

Students should also interrogate the representation of culture in the film and website and comment on the visual language and actual words used in making these representations. Students then write their own film review and post this on a class generated electronic web board.

NB. Deadly Unna? and Australian Rules provide a choice of wider social issues to examine throughout this unit of work.

· Internet access in a computer lab.
All students will demonstrate the ability to: use a research engine, evaluate the usefulness of various websites and write a film review using all of the codes and conventions expected of this type of text.

The teacher should compare the students’ prose fiction and film reviews to assess if progress has been made. In this case the codes and convention and the writing style is more important than the opinions and content of the review.
5.1
5.6
8. Learning how to organise information in a written text: Teacher directed questioning about the similarities and differences between the two texts should result in notes on the white/chalkboard. These dot points should be carefully arranged so as to organise the thinking for students who are visual learners. The teacher should consider using the flow chart idea used on the Worksheet 5 for ease of transferring information.

Students will then plan their response on the Worksheet 5. When the teacher has checked this, students can then attempt a first draft in their exercise books or folders. Teachers will have to include a vocabulary aspect to this activity so that students use words such as “alternatively”, “obversely”, “countering”, etc. and any such synonym of “different”. This is a good opportunity to include a thesaurus lesson.

· Worksheet 5: “How to write a compare and contrast response”
All students will demonstrate the ability to write a compare and contrast response using all of the codes and conventions expected of this type of text. In this case the codes and convention and the writing style is equally as important as the fine detail and technical aspects mentioned by the students.

Use the Marking criteria provided for this activity. Informal assessment for student engagement by the teacher.

4.9
4.10
4.13
Modelling phase
9. Annotating a modelled text: Read the Model text.
Using the OHP and OHT of the Model text, the teacher will annotate and make relevant chalk/whiteboard notes on the:
· structural features
· vocabulary
· underline where an interpretation has been made
· identifying the use of nominalisation and examples where the expression is clear and concise.

This activity will require a teacher led questioning session about the use of features, structures and vocabulary use. It will also necessitate the inclusion of the metalanguage to discuss elements of writing such as modality, nominalisation, and the precise use of grammatical terms. Students will copy the annotations made.


Using “Model text” copy a class set and make another copy onto OHT for your use

Informal assessment for student engagement by the teacher.

10. Building an interpretation: Students will need to use the “Messages from the Text” worksheet 6 and locate where they previously drafted the four interpretations sentences (within the Field building phase) in their exercise books or folders for this activity.

The teacher will read through the “Building an interpretation scaffold” worksheet 6 (OHT). As a class, jointly construct the orientation and second paragraph as a model for students.

Students are to use the “Building an interpretation scaffold” worksheet 6 as a guide. Students are to use their exercise books or folders to work out their ideas and draft paragraphs 3-5 for themselves.

Using the Quality Teaching element of “Significance” and “Connectedness” for ideas about the final sentence of each paragraph, brainstorm P.C. vocabulary and formal expression to communicate student ideas.

Worksheet 6: “Building an interpretation scaffold”

Copy a class set.

Make another copy onto OHT for your use.

All students will demonstrate the ability to write an interpretation of the text, Deadly Unna? using all of the codes and conventions expected of this type of text.

Use the Marking Criteria provided for this activity.

11. Prose fiction character matrix: The teacher is to use the ideas on both worksheets to prompt discussion about events and their expression via different mediums and the significance of these events in terms of literary, filmic and cultural constructions.

Teacher led organisation of the content to be recorded by students on the worksheets.

Students will complete the matrix for both Gary and his father based chiefly on the prose fiction version of the text.

Worksheet 7: Character matrix: The construction of Gary Black’s character in Phillip Gwynne’s Deadly Unna?

Worksheet 8: Character matrix: The construction of Mr Black’s character in Phillip Gwynne’s Deadly Unna?

All students will: complete all of the spaces on both worksheets.
Teacher judgement as to the correctness or otherwise of the answers given will need to be exercised here in light of class discussions.

12. Academic language: Teachers will articulate the process of nominalisation from the examples on the “How to sound convincing” worksheet #9. Teachers will also need to explain and demonstrate the process of changing personal language into a discussion of the concept rather than an explanation of student ideas.

Worksheet 9: “How to sound convincing”
All students will complete the examples on the worksheet. The teacher will mark this work specifically for grammatical accuracy in student writing.







4.2
4.4
4.5

The following activity is suggested for students who express their ideas very well verbally but experience difficulty with converting this into the written mode. This activity offers a simple structure for thinking and planning how to use language and is applicable for verbal and written modes.

13. How to write a simple paragraph: Students will read “A sure thing, never fail, fool proof, formula for simple paragraph writing”, worksheet 10 and copy the first example paragraph into their exercise books or folders. Students will attempt to write a paragraph in the given structure on Mr Black.

This exercise may be extended using other characters as topics for subsequent paragraphs.

Worksheet 10: “A ‘sure thing, never fail, fool proof, formula’ for simple paragraph writing”.
All students will submit at least one paragraph for marking.

Teachers should assess students’ efforts in terms of using the structure given.
1.7
14. Structural phase
Assessing the composer’s point of view: Teachers should reveal the use of racist and violent stereotypes in the text is intended to teach against those very stereotypes and attitudes, however, this may need to be discussed in a very sensitive manner so that all perspectives are included and then explained in light of the impression these stereotypes leave. Use the worksheet 11 “Assessing the composer’s point of view” to assist with the discussion.

Worksheet 11: “Assessing the composer’s point of view”
Informal assessment for student engagement by the teacher.
7.3
7.9
15. Binary Oppositions and stereotypes in representations: Using worksheet 11 as a guide, brainstorm characteristics for both Gary and Dumby. Teacher should check student knowledge of vocabulary used by redirecting questions for definition and meaning. Teacher should work through Q3 and Q4 using questioning to boost critical thinking about the characterisation.

Worksheet 12:
“Representations in Deadly Unna?
All students will complete the worksheet with 100% accuracy. The teacher will mark worksheets individually.
2.9
2.10
16. Film character matrix: The teacher is to use the ideas on both worksheets to prompt discussion about events and their expression via different mediums and the significance of these events in terms of literary, filmic and cultural constructions. Teacher led organisation of the content to be recorded by students on the worksheets. Students will complete the matrix for both Dumby Red and Clarence based chiefly on the film version of the text.
Worksheet 13: “Character matrix: The construction of Dumby Red’s film character”

Worksheet 14: “Character matrix: The construction of Clarence Red’s film character”

All students will: complete all of the spaces on both worksheets.
Teacher judgement as to the correctness or otherwise of the answers given will need to be exercised here in light of class discussions.
4.13
17. The vocabulary of academic writing: Distribute the handout “How to ‘say it’ in Writing”. Teacher to discuss grammatical implications of use. Teacher to demonstrate use of some words and phrases on the chalk/whiteboard in sentences offered by students.

· “How to ‘say it’ in writing” handout
Informal assessment for student engagement by the teacher.

1.1
1.5
Critical phase
18. How to be critical: This activity will form a synthesis of all the skills and knowledge activities from this unit of work.

Part 1. Content. Depending on the needs of the students in the class, teachers will need to revisit the ideas contained in worksheets numbered 4, 7, 8, 11, 12, 13 and on the websites mentioned.

Part 2. Using the scaffolds. Review the structure of a formal piece of writing. The codes and conventions of academic writing are to be found on worksheets numbered 2, 5, 6, 10.

Part 3. Having the words and style to do it. Re-teach the “Model Text”, referring to the “Vocabulary Handout” as well as worksheet 9.
NB. This process may take more than 1 lesson.

· Worksheets 4, 7, 8, 11, 13, 14
· Worksheets 2, 5, 6, 10
· “Model text”
· Worksheet 15: “Vocabulary handout”
· Worksheet 9: “How to sound convincing”
Informal assessment for student engagement by the teacher.
4.11
19. A critical response scaffold: This activity is designed to move students along the mode continuum towards more academic writing. Teacher may use a joint construction method of instruction, group work or set this as an individual piece of work or a combination of all styles to complete this activity.

Worksheet 16: “Critical response scaffold”.
All students should be engaged in this activity and the teacher should assess informally, however, students will need individual assistance with organising information.

1.11
20. Composing a critical and evaluative response to the set text: This is the culmination of the writing unit. Students will be set the following question and asked to write a critical response essay on one of the following essay topics. Teachers will notice that the questions are graded in difficulty.
1. How successful is Phillip Gwynne in addressing the wider social issues in Deadly Unna?
2. Deadly Unna? represents country life in “black and white” terms. Discuss specifically whether this is an accurate portrayal.
3. The composer, Phillip Gwynne, perpetuates stereotypes in his text, Deadly Unna? How and why does he do this?

· Assessment task notification

All students will compose a critical evaluation of Deadly Unna? using formal codes and conventions of language.

Teachers will use marking criteria provided to assess student learning.
external image clip_image002.jpg



Table of contents

Prescribed texts 14
Preparation 14
Unit outline 14
Activity 1 Introduction 3
Activity 2 The vernacular 4
Activity 3 The novel 4
Activity 4 Critical analysis 5
Activity 5 Gender 6
Activity 6 Controversy over the film adaptation 7
Activity 7 Assessment 8
Activity 8 Reflection 9
References 10
Appendix – Unit outcomes 11




external image clip_image004.gifStage 5 English unit: The vernacular

Prescribed texts
Deadly Unna? and Australian Rules


Duration
10 Weeks


Preparation
Students should read the novel before the unit commences. This can be achieved by establishing a homework/reading routine during the unit immediately preceding this one.

Teachers should ensure students are provided with adequate warning regarding the harsh language used in the texts.

Teachers should also ensure that all students understand that racist remarks will not be tolerated under any circumstance.


Unit outline
This unit is designed to engage students collaboratively with a focus on formal and informal language, especially vernacular usage. The unit will focus on a study of the novel Deadly Unna?. The film adaptation Australian Rules and the controversy that resulted from this production will also be examined. Students will learn how to construct an essay in response to these texts.





Teaching and learning program


Activity 1
external image clip_image004.gif Introduction
Outcomes
1.1, 4.10, 4.11, 4.14, 4.2, 4.7, 4.8, 6.1, 8.8, 9.2, 10.7, 10.8, 11.1, 11.5, 11.6, 11.11, 11.13
Student workbook
Activity 1.1 - 1.4 pages 3 - 10
Activity 7.1 pages 31 - 35
Activity 8 pages 37
Activity 1.1
Teacher establishes groups for the unit and reviews group skills. Tasks are to be undertaken in groups unless working with a partner or individual work is indicated.

Activity 1.2
Groups complete ‘Metalanguage and word bank’ activity (Activity 1.2). Groups construct flashcards by writing a vocabulary word on one side and its definition on the other. Students negotiate roles and responsibilities. This may be started and added to as the unit progresses. The vocabulary should be displayed around the room.

Groups may also create a collaborative PowerPoint presentation that illustrates examples of vocabulary from the novel.

Activity 1.3
Exploration of the novel’s historical and cultural context. This is aided by looking at the conventions of writing a feature article. Groups complete a cloze passage at the conclusion of this activity.

Unit assessment
Teacher discusses the final essay assessment (Activity 7) and reflection (Activity 8) processes to be undertaken, as well as the overall expectations for the unit.
Activity 1.4 Extension – may be taken individually, in pairs or groups of students.

Students brainstorm ideas about how to identify the original language spoken in the local area. Predict which idea will be the most effective.

Students complete the research into the original language of the area discovering if the language is still spoken.

What was the most effective method of researching?

List some vocabulary from this original language and their translation and display around the room.

Read more about the early European history of Sydney and the Indigenous languages spoken during this time. http://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/barani/themes/theme1.htm

Ask your librarian to recommend novels written by Indigenous authors and select one to read.




Activity 2
external image clip_image004.gif The vernacular
Outcomes
4.2, 4.4, 4.5, 4.6, 4.7, 4.8, 4.10, 4.11, 4.12, 4.14, 5.1
Student workbook
Activity 2 pages 11-12
Activity 2
Groups complete questions on vernacular language using Activity 2 in the student workbook.




Activity 3
external image clip_image004.gif The novel
Outcomes
1.1, 2.3, 2.5, 3.3, 3.8, 4.10, 4.11, 4.12, 4.14, 4.14, 4.3, 4.6, 4.7, 4.9, 5.3, 5.9, 6.1, 6.1, 6.2, 11.16, 11.4, 11.5
Student workbook
Activity 3.1 and 3.2 pages 13 -17
Activity 3.1
Using pages 13 to 15 of the student workbook the class analyse the features and forms employed by the author in Deadly Unna?. These include voice and position of the narrator.

Activity 3.2a
Individual students jot down exactly 10 words to describe ‘Blacky’ on a loose sheet of paper. From this a whole class list is compiled and distributed or displayed.

Individual students imagine they are ‘Blacky’ and compose four diary entries, each exactly 50 words in length (a total of exactly 200 words):
Compose an entry for ‘Blacky’s diary’ where he describes himself.
Follow this with an entry describing Dumby Red.
Then an entry describing Mr. Black.
Finally, an entry describing Mrs Black.

Once students have completed their four diary entries, they swap them with a partner. Each student then annotates their partner’s diary entries to make evaluative comments and highlight the following features of the text:
personal pronouns
informal usage
slang
colloquialism
contractions.

Make evaluative comments about how well the diary entries describe the various characters.

Activity 3.2b
Individual students use a word processor to construct one paragraph descriptions of ‘Blacky’, ‘Dumby Red’, Mr Black and Mrs Black. Paragraphs should be written in third person using formal language. Students then find a partner (in the order they finish). Each student annotates their partner’s paragraphs (swap computers) to make evaluative comments and assess the following:
paragraph structure
topic sentence
body sentences
concluding sentence
adjectives
nouns
verbs
third person
punctuation.

These annotations may be completed by going to ‘insert’ and ‘comment’ in Microsoft Word.

Individual students reflect on how their partner’s annotations may help them to improve their standard of writing.




Activity 4
external image clip_image004.gif Critical analysis
Outcomes
1.1, 2.3, 2.5, 3.3, 3.8, 4.10, 4.11, 4.12, 4.14, 4.14, 4.3, 4.6, 4.7, 4.9, 5.3, 5.9, 6.1, 6.1, 6.2, 11.16, 11.4, 11.5
Student workbook
Activity 4 pages 18-19
Activity 4
Discussion and writing responses to questions on pages 20 – 21.

  1. What does the composer of Deadly Unna? want us to know about life in a small Australian town?

  1. What kinds of social realities does Deadly Unna? portray for Aboriginal people?

  1. Explain the appropriateness of the language used in Deadly Unna? and Australian Rules.

  1. How are Aboriginal teenagers represented in both the film and novel?

  1. How are adults represented in these texts? Which adults are represented positively? Why?

  1. What is real about the portrayal of the Indigenous characters in Deadly Unna??

  1. What view of the world are these texts presenting?

  1. What different interpretations of Australian Rules are possible?

  1. How do contextual factors influence how Australian Rules is interpreted by Australian audiences of Aboriginal background?




Activity 5
external image clip_image004.gifGender
Outcomes
1.1, 4.10, 4.11, 4.14, 4.2, 4.7, 4.8, 6.1, 8.8, 9.2, 10.7, 10.8, 11.1, 11.5, 11.6, 11.11, 11.13
Student workbook
Activity 5 pages 20-21
Teacher constructs definition of ‘gender’ with students.

Possible definition: Gender refers to the understandings and behaviours we develop to indicate our identity as male or female. Gender is socially constructed i.e. we develop these understandings and behaviours as a result of our interactions with the society in which we live. We are constantly receiving messages about what it means to be male and female from our family, friends, the media and various social organisations. Sometimes people feel pressured to conform to particular messages known as gender stereotypes. This can be problematic for people as it may prevent them from becoming the individual they really want to be. Our understandings and behaviours change over the course of our lifetime – they are not fixed.

For homework, groups collect popular culture magazines that can be cut up.
Each group makes two gender collages: one a representation of males, the other a representation of females.

Each group records (Activity 5) how gender is represented in popular magazines using the following prompts/table:
clothing
facial expression and gaze
build
posture
body language
activity
gesture.

Contexts & Conventions (2001) by Rod Quinn and Hugh Rayner is a useful text when constructing answers to the next questions. Chapter 6 is especially useful.

Teacher asks students to complete questions 1 – 5 relating to Gender on page 23 of the Student workbook.




Activity 6
external image clip_image004.gif Controversy over the film adaptation of Australian Rules
Outcomes
5.2, 5.4, 6.5, 6.9, 10.11, 10.12
Student workbook
Activity 6 pages 22-28
Groups read through and complete questions regarding Cultural Protocols.

Groups read and take notes from Australian Rules – for who? and How to be an artist without offending anyone to enable them to participate in a class debate. The topic for the debate is: The film Australian Rules should never have been screened.




Activity 7
Assessment - Essay
Outcomes
1.1, 4.10, 4.11, 4.14, 4.2, 4.7, 4.8, 6.1, 9.2, 10.11, 10.12, 10.3, 10.4, 10.7, 11.11, 11.5
Student workbook
Activity 7 pages 29-34
Activity 7
Teacher leads class through the unit’s assessment task - an essay.

Teacher explains process of writing:
brainstorm
plan
find supporting quotes
evidence
draft
conference
word process
conference and edit
publish.

Class essays will then be marked collaboratively using (attached) criteria
Extension Activity: Representations
Individual students requiring extension complete Activity 7 - Representations.
Assessment
Essay question: How effectively does the composer use language to create the world of the novel Deadly Unna??




Activity 8
external image clip_image004.gif Reflection on Unit
Outcomes
11.7, 11.8, 11.12, 11.16
Student workbook
Activity 8 page 35
Activity 8

Individual students read through and complete questions on page 37 - Reflection.







References


Clendinnen, Inga, Dancing With Strangers, Text Publishing, 2003

Collins, Felicity and Davis, Therese, Australian Cinema After Mabo, Cambridge University Press, 2004

Goldman, Paul, Australian Rules, 2002

Gwynne Phillip, Deadly Unna?, 1998

(Audio book) Deadly Unna?, 2001

Howie Mark, A Transformative Model of Programming 7-10 English, Metaphor November 2003

Quinn, Rod and Rayner, Hugh, Contexts & Conventions, Longman, (2001)
Tudball, Libby, Australian Rules: 'light and frothy…with some dark seeds thrown in', ASE, 2003

Message Stick (ABC): http://www.abc.net.au/message/proper/

Study Guide: http://www.actf.com.au/learning_centre/school_resources/productions/aur/resources/ar_study_guide.pdf



Appendix – Unit outcomes

Students learn to:
1.1
respond to and compose a range of imaginative, factual and critical texts which are increasingly demanding in terms of their linguistic, structural, cognitive, emotional and moral complexity

Students learn to:
2.3
vary their use of the processes of planning, drafting, rehearsing, editing and publishing to compose appropriately and effectively crafted and sustained texts in a range of modes and media
2.5
assess the achievements of their own and others’ compositions and responses according to specific guidelines of effectiveness for purpose, audience and context

Students learn to:
3.3
use advanced word processing tools including formatting of references and bibliographies, formatting multiple page documents including weblinks, importing data from internet and manipulating images to compose and format texts for different purposes, audiences and contexts, including the workplace
3.8
advanced tools and uses of information and communication technologies including references, bibliographies, formatting multiple page documents, weblinks, importing data from the internet and manipulating images

Students learn to:
4.2
describe, explain and evaluate the composer’s choices of language forms and features and structures of texts in terms of purpose, audience and context
4.3
use appropriate language forms and features and structures of texts in their own compositions and describe, explain and justify their choices in terms of purpose, audience and context
4.4
experiment with and explain altered perceptions of ideas and information that result from changes in language features and structures
4.5
identify purpose, audience and context of texts through consideration of the language forms and features, and structures used in the texts
4.6
adapt and justify language use appropriate to spoken, written and visual texts
4.6
adapt and justify language use appropriate to spoken, written and visual texts
4.7
identify and critically evaluate the use of Standard Australian English, its variations and levels of usage

Students learn about:
4.8
the ways in which spoken, written and visual texts are shaped according to personal, historical, cultural, social
4.9
appropriate language forms and features and structures of texts to use in an increasingly wide range of contexts
4.10
the metalanguage for describing, explaining and justifying the composer’s choices of language forms and features and structures of texts in terms of purpose, audience and context
4.11
the influence of purpose, audience and context on the use of particular language forms and features and structures of texts
4.12
the significance of the relationship between purpose, audience and context
4.14
the appropriateness of the use of Standard English, its variations and levels of usage

Students learn to:
5.1
apply knowledge of language forms and features and structures of texts to respond to, compose and adapt texts to suit new and unfamiliar contexts
5.2
compose written, oral and visual texts for personal, historical, cultural, social, technological and workplace contexts
5.3
adapt their own or familiar texts into different forms, structures, modes and media for different purposes, audiences and contexts
5.4
identify, describe and explain the differences emerging as a result of such adaptations

Students learn about:
5.9
the selection, organisation and coherence of information and ideas in texts

Students learn to:
6.1
explore real and imagined (including virtual) worlds through close and wide engagement with increasingly demanding texts
6.2
respond imaginatively and interpretively to an increasingly demanding range of literary and non-literary texts
6.5
experiment with ways of representing the real world imaginatively

Students learn about:
6.9
the ways in which imaginative texts can explore universal themes and social reality

Students learn about:
8.8
the metalanguage for identifying, describing and explaining relationships between and among texts

Students learn to:
9.2
relate the content and ideas in texts to the world beyond the texts

Students learn to:
10.1
identify cultural elements expressed in the language, structure and content of texts drawn from popular culture, youth cultures, cultural heritages and the workplace
10.10
the ways situational and cultural elements of context shape texts
10.11
the beliefs and value systems underpinning texts from different cultures
10.12
how texts sustain or challenge established cultural attitudes
10.2
identify, explain and challenge cultural values, purposes and assumptions including gender, ethnicity, religion, youth, age, disability, sexuality, cultural diversity, social class and work in texts
10.3
interpret texts from a range of perspectives and justify the interpretations
10.3
interpret texts from a range of perspectives and justify the interpretations
10.4
engage with details of texts to respond and compose from a range of social and critical perspectives

Students learn about:
10.7
the language used to express contemporary cultural issues
10.8
the effects of personal, social, historical and technological perspectives on language and communication

Students learn to:
11.1
understand the learning purposes, specific requirements and targeted outcomes of tasks
11.4
choose learning processes, resources and technologies appropriate for particular tasks and situations
11.5
use individual and group processes to generate, investigate, document, clarify, refine, critically evaluate and present ideas and information drawn from books, the internet and other sources of information
11.6
establish and adopt roles and responsibilities, negotiate and implement strategies and meet deadlines
11.7
reflect on and assess their own and others’ learning and learning strategies against outcomes, criteria and guidelines established for tasks
11.8
articulate and discuss the pleasures and difficulties, successes and challenges experienced in investigation, problem-solving, independent and collaborative work, and establish improved practices

Students learn about:
11.11
outcomes, criteria and guidelines for tasks and the value of outcomes-based learning
11.12
their own learning strengths and learning needs including their preferred ways of gathering, processing and representing information
11.13
management strategies including drawing up schedules, timing, delegation and sharing in group work
11.16
ways in which reflection and self-evaluation can assist learning